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Learning to differentiate

September 13, 2012
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Saw this on a friend’s facebook page this morning and asked him if I could share it here:

From a friend here in Jordan who worked in Benghazi. It is a helpful reminder that, as with all violent acts committed anywhere, we must differentiate between the group that committed them and the (usually much larger) group that did not.

From his friend:

One of the doctors that received Ambassador Stevens body in Benghazi a few nights ago told me that Stevens was rushed to BMC hospital by a group of everyday Libyans where Libyan doctors tried for over an hour to resuscitate him without any success. Though, I am angry and saddened by the events that took place, its important for those outside of Libya to understand that the stance of those who killed Stevens is a stance that is held by a very small group of Libyans. The rest of Libya is saddened and angry just as those in America and throughout the world are.

A facebook page has even been setup by Libyan’s attempting to let their own voices be heard in regard to the tragedy. The description for the group says:

The Sorry Project “We Are Sorry” A project showing that the majority of the Libyan people oppose the crimes and violent actions committed against the US embassy.

We need to stop painting entire populations with the same brush. No situation is ever that simple. The problem is that it is easy to lump everyone together and label them all as terrorists or haters of America or whatever. We need to stop letting fear drive us. Most Americans are clueless when it comes to understanding and knowing about the countries, peoples, and dynamics of this region and because of that we see these isolated incidents and assume everyone in those places feels the same way. The media only adds to this by constantly presenting the news in a way that makes it seem that way and constantly playing on the fears of people. But, as you can see from above, that is just not true.

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